Fractured Projections

Studio Portraits

Titled 'Fractured Projections', it was a project that questions the traditional conventions of portraiture and highlights the uncertainty and awkwardness of the pose. \r\n

Fractured Projections

I am going to start working on some portraits over the next few months, but before i start i wanted to go back to a project i worked on when doing my degree a number of years ago now. Titled ‘Fractured Projections’, it was a project that questions the traditional conventions of portraiture and highlights the uncertainty and awkwardness of the pose. These digitally manipulated portraits intend to provoke and exaggerate a sense of loss of character and confusion, in relation to the moment in time that exists just before the shutter is released. This can create a momentary uncertainty that in turn brings forward a confused state of self consciousness and the subject can deploy a ‘fractured projection’ of themselves.\r\n\r\nI used two lights with grids on to control spill light, both lights from the side to create shadows adding to the moody and uncomfortable feel to the portraits.

Fractured Projections

The Hasselblad medium format camera with digital back attached gives an incredible amount of detail to work with. Many hours it took to cut and paste all the different parts of the faces from different angles to achieve each completed portrait.

Fractured Projections

Fractured Projections

Despite all the manipulations enveloping modern imagery is it still a possibility to capture the essence of an individual. Their maybe a case for both yes and no, but it also has a lot to do with the subject and the creator of the portrait, plus the connection that develops between the two. It is more likely you can capture in some way the personality of someone if you connect with them and make them feel as comfortable as they can be, and find out what it is that they are passionate about, what drives them every day.

Fractured Projections

Here is a final statement to chew on from Roy Exley,\r\n\r\n”Increasingly digital imagery is becoming a surrogate for the false reality of the traditional photographic image. So in effect we have a veneer of variable ‘truths’ superimposed upon a framework of mutable realities. Ultimately however, viewers need to believe in what their eyes deem to be the truth, and thus are required to adjust their thresholds of belief”.\r\n\r\nRoy Exley

Leave a Reply